“It’s too…(hard, busy…)”

Picture of cheese as a play on cheese with a complaining whine.

Do you need some cheese with that “whine”? We have likely heard this play on the phrase “wine and cheese” when someone is whining. Our team members are not immune to it…and neither are we.

But let’s face it, phrases that start with, “It’s too…[hard, busy, new, different]” usually equate to one thing…a whine or EXCUSE.

Where there’s a will, there’s a way

Willingness is a key component of change and growth. Without it, even the most capable person wallows in mediocrity or stagnates their progress.

In order to overcome a challenge or obstacle, we must apply willingness. When I see stories in the news or posts on Facebook of individuals overcoming impossible odds, such as Nick Vujicic, Aldo Amenta, or Anna Sarol, our willingness seems pale by comparison.

“In order to accomplish something, you must be willing to do whatever it takes to accomplish it.”

Mike Hernacki

Now I’m not saying this is to do anything illegal but let’s take it to where the rubber meets the road in our offices with two examples of what we can do to foster success.

“It’s too hard to remember.”

Really? I know the change of a habit is not easy but we can prepare in advance.

An example of this is when I hear some individuals needing to exchange one word in their greeting. The culprit is the word “can” instead of “may.” The last part of our introduction should be, “How may I help you?”

And why do we say “may”? “May” is a permission word and “can” is an ability word. You may remember this from your grade school days when you asked your teacher to leave the room to go to the bathroom. You may have said, “Can I go to the bathroom?” to which your teacher sarcastically responded, “I don’t know…CAN you?”

Then you would make the exchange to use the correct word and repeat yourself by saying, “May I go to the bathroom?” Then your teacher would grant you permission.

The same happens on the phone. We have teachers and English majors calling our offices and though they may not say the sarcastic response out loud, I can guarantee they are saying it in their head. So, exchange the word and remove an unnecessary hurdle. Say it correctly and demonstrate you take care of even the little details to get them accurate.

What can you do? Create a reminder…a sticky note to be placed at your phone. That way we set ourselves up for success as we exchange one habit for another. (For more on exchanging habits, refer to Charles Duhigg’s book, The Power of Habit.)

“We’re too busy to take an inquiry call on paper first.”

Here is another one. When I hear this whine or excuse, it cries the need for a checklist. Checklists are invaluable as a safety net ensuring nothing is missed, and they serve as a communication and trust tool allowing anyone to notice, at a glance, the status of the process.

It is said best in The Checklist Manifesto that checklists:

…provide a kind of cognitive net. They catch mental flaws inherent in all of us – flaws of memory and attention and thoroughness.

Atul Gawande

The debate over taking an initial call directly into the computer versus on paper doesn’t seem to go away. A summary of the debate can be obtained here.

But that is not the point here. We want to apply willingness to create the best first call experience while not forgetting to input the details into our system. So what do we need to ensure we do what it takes to make it excellent and without error? A checklist!

Create a checklist and stick to it. Not only will your callers have a better experience, but you can then move some of the tasks on the list to a quieter time of the day, allowing for level loading of work capacity. Checklists are critical to your office’s playbook of success.

Summary

Watch out for when a whine or excuse bubbles up in your office. A key indicator of them is hearing phrases start with, “It’s too…”

Finally, apply true willingness to overcome the obstacle. Do what it takes! A couple of examples are reminders and checklists. Do so and you will set the environment for excellence!

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